HTML Boilerplates | CSS-Tricks

Manuel Matuzović goes line-by-line through a boilerplate HTML document. I like it. It’s a good reference and has a lot of the same type of stuff I tend to put in the main HTML template. It makes me think about how opinionated this kind of thing can be. Dang near every line! Not the DOCTYPE, not the , but nearly everything else. </p> <p>The HTML <!DOCTYPE html><br /> <html lang="en" class="no-js"><br /> <head><br /> <meta charset="UTF-8"><br /> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width"></p> <p> <title>Unique page title – My Site
















Maybe my site doesn’t use any JavaScript or have no-JavaScript fallbacks so I don’t need any of the class name dancing. Maybe my site doesn’t need print styles, but I do need link prefetching. Maybe I don’t care about social images, but I do want critical CSS in the head. It’s a boilerplate, not a prescription — it’s meant to be changed.
There was a time when HTML5 Boilerplate was a huge project in this space. It has a whole GitHub Org! The boilerplate has 50,000 stars! Personally, I feel like the project lost its way when it started to have a src and dist folder and a 200-line Gulp build process, ya know? It worked best as a reference for what stuff any given web project might need, but now I feel like it is intimidating in a way it doesn’t need to be. The boilerplate index file is also quite opinionated. It assumes Normalize and Modernizr, which are certainly not deprecated projects, but also not things I see developers reaching for much anymore. It even assumes Google Analytics usage!
I have no problem with people having and sharing boilerplate documents, but considering how unavoidable being opinionated it is with them, I also like the reference guide approach. Just show me every possible thing that can go in the (a lot of the value of these boilerplates), and I’ll pick and choose what I need (or may have forgotten). To that end, Josh Buchea’s HEAD project is pretty cool.

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