Supercharging Built-In Elements With Web Components “is” Easier Than You Think

We’ve already discussed how creating web components is easier than you think, but there’s another aspect of the specification that we haven’t discussed yet and it’s a way to customize (nay, supercharge) a built-in element. It’s similar to creating fully custom or “autonomous” elements — like the element from the previous articles—but requires a few differences.
Customized built-in elements use an is attribute to tell the browser that this built-in element is no mild-mannered, glasses-wearing element from Kansas, but is, in fact, the faster than a speeding bullet, ready to save the world, element from planet Web Component. (No offense intended, Kansans. You’re super too.)
Supercharging a mild-mannered element not only gives us the benefits of the element’s formatting, syntax, and built-in features, but we also get an element that search engines and screen readers already know how to interpret. The screen reader has to guess what’s going on in a element, but has some idea of what’s happening in a